Real Talk

Living the dolce vita lifestyle isn’t as hard as you think

The phrase “La dolce vita” conjures up various images of cruising around on Vespas through the rolling Tuscan hills to flicking through a newspapers in a bar whilst enjoying a coffee or two. However, essentially, La Dolce Vita is the concept of an easy-going life that is lived to the full - which really you could do anywhere.

Here's how to have a little dolce vita in your daily life.

Work- Life Balance

I believe one of the most important factors affecting an individual’s dolce vita is their work-life balance. Whilst in the more northern areas of Italy, such as Milan, there is more of a work-to-live attitude, in the south this is not so much the case.

If happiness really is as strong a factor in contributing to longevity as I like to believe that it is, then this would go a long way in explaining why Italians count themselves amongst those with one of the highest life expectancies in the world.

RELATED: 5 HAPPINESS LESSONS TO APPLY TO YOUR EVERYDAY 

Slow Down a Little

Italians are famous for their laidback attitude, and I believe that emulating this could make all of us a bit happier. Take a little time to slow down and appreciate what you have around you, be that through travelling to somewhere that you have always dreamed of going, cooking a delicious meal, or taking the time to call a loved one.

Change Your Attitude

We are indoctrinated from a young age to always look ahead to the next step – be that taking the right exams to get into university, or the right strategy to get that promotion at work. It is so, so easy to get lost in this uncertain future and forget about what makes us happy right now. By living more in the present, I am certain that we can all get that bit closer to achieving our dolce vita.

RELATED: THE KEY TO HAPPINESS: HOW TO ACHIEVE THE ULTIMATE WORK/LIFE BALANCE

Check in with your family

Family is one of the most important parts of Italian culture – grandparents will be looked after and respected. About two thirds of young Italian adults, called “mammone”, live at home with their parents. Of course, there are many contributing factors for this, but Italians maintain very close family bonds.

So take the time to reach out to that relative that you haven’t spoken to in a while. As the saying goes, you can choose your friends, but you can’t choose your family. So you might as well embrace this fact, and show your family some Italian-style affection.

Take a trip

Rome wasn’t built in a day, and its attitudes are not going to change overnight. If you can, take some time out of your schedule to be inspired and renewed by the beauty of this incredible country. I can promise that you will not be disappointed.

Buona fortuna!

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