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Euro 2024 host cities guide: Where should I go in Germany this summer?

Olympiastadion in Berlin, Germany

With the football season coming to a close across most of Europe in the next few weeks, it won’t be long until one of the most prestigious tournaments begins. Yup, that’s right, Euro 2024 will be kicking off in mid-June, and this year, it’s in Germany.

Why is this special? Well, the last tournament was spread all across Europe, and while it was nice to see hosting duties shared between a few different countries, Euro 2024 could have a bit more identity to it with it taking place just in Germany. The country also has a rich footballing heritage, and the last major international tournament held there in 2006 (the World Cup) was an absolute gem.

But where is it all happening you ask? What matches should I try to catch in the fan parks (or the stadiums if you’re lucky enough to get a ticket)? And what are the things you simply have to do in each city? This is your guide to all the host cities in Euro 2024.

Berlin

The stadium: Olympiastadion. 74,461. 

Fun fact: There’s a reason why this featured on our European groundhopping guide. It has got to be one of the most unique grounds in the tournament with a huge gap at one end, in which the Olympic cauldron stands, while it neighbours the outdoor swimming pool which is still in use today.

The one match you have to watch here: The final. Fairly obvious, but this is where the tournament will all come to an end and the winners will be crowned. The last major international final hosted here saw France captain Zinedine Zidane headbutt Italian defensive maestro Marco Materazzi so the stadium has previous for drama on the showpiece occasion…

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: Museum Island. A dream for all the efficient culture vultures among you. In this UNESCO World Heritage Site, you can hit up five museums which are all ridiculously close to each other.

The hidden gem you should seek out: Ok, so this one technically isn’t in Berlin, but about an hour by train outside the city is the beautiful sprawling green Spreewald which is a biosphere reserve. Here you can rent a small boat and make your way around winding streams which gives off massive Lord of the Rings vibes.

Leipzig

The stadium: Red Bull Arena. 42,959. 

Fun fact: This ground is in beaut surroundings with trees planted all around the edge while it sits on the banks of the Elsterbecken.

The one match you have to watch here: It’s too close to call between two group games with four heavyweights playing here in the early stages of the tournament. First the Netherlands play France, then Italy will come up against Croatia.

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: Bach Museum. Leipzig is heavily associated with classical music, and you can learn more about one of the greatest ever composers in the city where he lived for decades.

The hidden gem you should seek out: Leipzig Cotton Mill. What was an old industrial site is now a bustling creative space with around 100 artists showing off their work in galleries and shops.

Munich

The stadium: Allianz Arena. 70,076. 

Fun fact: Its exterior has huge translucent panels which glow at night to make it look like a colourful lantern.

The one match you have to watch here: The opener with hosts Germany taking on Scotland. Wanna watch it in style? Head to the Olympic Park to watch it on a colossal floating screen sitting in the middle of a lake.

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: The English Garden. This is one of the largest urban parks in the world complete with a beer garden, and you can also spot surfers trying out their moves on the Eisbach.

The hidden gem you should seek out: Augustiner-Bräu. You knew a beer hall was coming at some point, and this is a personal fave. You’ll find Augustiner beer halls throughout Germany (and Munich for that matter) so do wander in if you see any of them, but for the OG brewery, head to Landsberger Strasse in the west of the city for a taste of history (and a delicious dark dunkel beer).

Stuttgart

The stadium: MHPArena. 54,906. 

Fun fact: It has a fabric roof which can withstand up to 1,000kg of weight per square decimeter.

The one match you have to watch here: This COULD be the quarter-final in which Germany play, and if they do, they may be coming up against Spain, or Croatia, or Italy…

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: Porsche Museum. If you like a fast car, here’s the place you need to go. There’s even a workshop with a huge glass window which you can look through as employees restore vintage cars.

The hidden gem you should seek out: Pig Museum. What once was an abattoir is now home to a museum holding thousands of artefacts all about our piggy friends.

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Cologne

The stadium: RheinEnergieStadion. 49,827.

Fun fact: FC Köln, who play here, have a real life mascot which is a goat called Hennes who you can see at all home games, and on a webcam at the zoo when it’s not matchday.

The one match you have to watch here: Whoever tops Group B out of Spain, Italy, Croatia or Albania will play their first knockout game here against one of the third placed teams, so there’ll likely be a European heavyweight in town.

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: Cologne Cathedral. This is Germany’s most visited landmark, with visitors flocking to its iconic twin spires which tower into the sky.

The hidden gem you should seek out: Mustard Museum. Are you a fan of a spicy condiment? Well, visit here and you may even get lucky enough to have a free tasting.

Frankfurt

The stadium: Waldstadion. 54,697. 

Fun fact: This stadium has actually seen plenty of American Football action too, with current Super Bowl champions Kansas City Chiefs beating the Miami Dolphins there in 2023.

The one match you have to watch here: The pick of the matches in Group C and a repeat of the Euro 2020 semi-final as England take on Denmark.

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: Römerberg. This square looks like something you’d see on a Christmas card, and with good reason. Every year, it holds a Christmas market which illuminates all the beautiful old buildings that surround it with twinkly lights.

The hidden gem you should seek out: Peeing Tree. This is one of the more unique art installations you’re likely to see. In an old maple tree in one of the city’s nature areas, there is a pipe sticking out with water coming out of it. (Don’t worry – it is categorically not pee).

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Düsseldorf

The stadium: Merkur-Spiel Arena. 51,031.

Fun fact: The stadium hosted the Eurovision Song Contest in 2011.

The one match you have to watch here: There’ll be a quarter-final here, and it could see England face Spain, Croatia or Italy.

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: Tonhalle Düsseldorf. This is a beautiful concert hall with an iconic green roof dome – see if you can catch the Düsseldorf Symphony here for a classy night.

The hidden gem you should seek out: EKŌ-Haus. The city has a large Japanese community, and here you’ll find a gorgeous Japanese house, as well as a Japanese garden and tea room.

Dortmund

The stadium: Signal Iduna Park. 65,849.

Fun fact: The south side of the stadium is the largest standing terrace in European football where 24,000 fans can watch the football (albeit everyone in the stand will actually be sat down at the tournament due to rules from Europe’s governing football body, UEFA).

The one match you have to watch here: The semi-final which could feature France, the Netherlands, England, or Belgium… but there’s a lot of football to be played before then so we’re not sure!

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: German Football Museum. Not already got your football fix? Head here to watch over 25 hours of film material plus all sorts of interesting exhibitions. 

The hidden gem you should seek out: U-Tower. Once a brewery, and now an arts centre. As the name suggests, it has a giant U on top of a tower which gives off massive art-deco vibes.

Gelsenkirchen

The stadium: Arena AufSchalke. 54,740.

Fun fact: Due to the rich mining history of the town, they have designed the players’ tunnel to look like a coal mine.

The one match you have to watch here: Undoubtedly Spain v Italy which will be one of the standout matches in the “group of death”. 

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: Nordsternpark. A colossal green space which still has features of the former mine which it’s on top of.

The hidden gem you should seek out: Landschaftspark Duisburg-Nord. A 20-minute drive away out of Gelsenkirchen is this old industrial estate which has now been redeveloped into a public park including a climbing wall in a building which used to store iron ore and the largest indoor diving basin in Europe.

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Hamburg

The stadium: Volksparkstadion. 52,245.

Fun fact: Slightly morbid, but fans of the team Hamburger SV who play here have a dedicated graveyard near to the ground where they can be buried under turf from the pitch.

The one match you have to watch here: Group D kicks off here when Poland play the Netherlands. It should be an electric atmosphere with plenty of Polish fans with Hamburg only being a 4-hour drive away from the border, contrasted by the huge sea of orange down one end of the stadium as the Dutch support always flock in large numbers to watch their side in tournament football.

The one thing you need to tick off the bucket list here: St Pauli. Once you find this quarter in the west of the city, you may never leave. This vibrant area has a diverse nightlife, a rival football club with a very distinctive libertarian identity, and a fish market which you can head to after a night out in the early hours of Sunday to get your hands on a delicious fish sandwich and a cup of coffee to blow the cobwebs off. Oh, and fun fact, the Beatles used to live here too. Plus, the Hamburg Euro 2024 fan park is here, so you have no excuse not to pay it a visit.

The hidden gem you should seek out: Miniatur Wunderland. This wunderland of a miniature world including a looong model train set is sure to give you major wanderlust. Cast your eyes over a tiny Mount Rushmore and even tinier working cable cars drifting over Swiss mountains.

Wanna check it out for yourself this summer? Why not check out London to Berlin by Train, European Discovery which heads through Munich, or European Vistas where you’ll stop off in Hamburg?
Can’t get yourself to Germany? No problem. You’ll find Euro 2024 on the TV in pretty much any town or city in Europe in June and July, and the atmosphere should be on point wherever you go.

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