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11 foods you need to try to celebrate Thanksgiving Canadian-style

Canadian Thanksgiving takes place on the second Monday of October every single year.  It’s a chance for people to come together, give thanks, and eat delicious food. There are different discussions on how and when Thanksgiving exactly started. Although we do know that it wasn’t until 1957 when Thanksgiving was officially declared a national holiday.

However you choose to recognize and celebrate Thanksgiving, it’s the food that can truly bring people together. Here are 11 Canadian Thanksgiving foods you must add to your feast this year…

Smoked salmon

Canada is renowned for it’s fresh salmon found on both of the nation’s coasts. So why wouldn’t you work it into your Canadian Thanksgiving food plans? It makes a tasty pre-dinner treat to devour as you await the main dish! Make it simple by adding smoked salmon and cream cheese to a crispy cracker. If you want to get real fancy, create a masterpiece in dip form. A few simple ingredients like cream cheese and sour cream go a long way to elevate the fresh and smoky salmon flavours. You’re welcome.

Maple glazed turkey

No turkey at a Canadian Thanksgiving is like watching a movie with no protagonist. It’s the main dish, the leading actor, the thanksgiving HERO! But to spice it up Canadian style, why not consider adding maple syrup to the mix? The sweetness of the syrup and saltiness of the turkey is a winning combination. Does it get more Canadian than that?

Bacon and Brussels sprouts

Everything tastes better with bacon, right? Spruce up your traditional roasted brussels sprouts with Canadian bacon. It’s more like ham compared to the American version, so you can really taste the tenderness. Roast them all together with a bit of oil (and maybe maple syrup) for a side dish worthy of rave reviews.

Maple glazed carrots

Ontario is the number one producer of carrots in Canada so you can easily access some of this fresh vegetable no matter where you are. A traditional Canadian Thanksgiving side-dish is the maple roasted carrots. Roast them slow and long to get that tenderness, so they slice easily with a knife. And don’t forget, maple syrup is your friend.

 

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Creamed corn

Canada grows a whole lot of corn with Ontario and Quebec making up most of the grain-corn growth in the country. A nice way to include corn into your thanksgiving dinner plans is to cream it. Use corn, cream, butter and a touch of black pepper to create this creamy, sweet, and delicious Canadian Thanksgiving food.

Poutine râpée

Did you think we’d leave poutine out of this Canadian mix? Well poutine râpée is not exactly your typical poutine dish, but a traditional one unique to New Brunswick. It started way back in the day when the Acadians first settled on the east coast. It’s a boiled potato dumpling stuffed with pork which makes it a delicious alternative to your standard mashed or sweet potatoes.

Sweet potato dinner rolls

Sure, you can serve any old bun as a side at your festive feast, but why not Canadianize it? Add sweet potatoes to your dinner roll recipe to add a little element of surprise. Plus, they taste even better with maple syrup butter. Bet you didn’t even know that was a thing. Again, you’re so welcome.

Cranberry sauce

Cranberries are native to Canada. In fact, Canada is the second-largest producer of cranberries in the entire world! So there are certainly no shortages of these guys across the nation and no reason to skip out on the cranberry sauce at Thanksgiving. You can purchase store-bought cans or make your own. It’s simple and only involves a few key ingredients like sugar, water, and lemon zest.

Butter tarts

Anyone who has grown up in Ontario would be very familiar with this classic. The butter tart is a Canadian staple, right up there with the Nanaimo bar and Caesar. It’s a delicious dessert made with a creamy filling and pastry shell. There are many variations of the recipe so you can get creative and make it your own.

 

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Apple pie

Apples were first produced in Canada by early French settlers in Nova Scotia. Nowadays you can find about 40 varieties of this fruit including the most famous, the McIntosh, across Canada. Whip this delicious fruit up into pie form for your next festive meal.

Pumpkin pie

It’s pumpkin season baby. Pumpkins have been grown in Canada for hundreds of years, long before PSL’s were a thing. Their rich and nutty flavour goes extremely well with other thanksgiving dishes making it the perfect treat to round off your meal. With hints of ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, and maybe a smidge of maple syrup for good measure, your pumpkin pie will be key to keeping your guests coming back next year.

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